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Research at MUCCRI

 

    Audience

    Farmers, extension workers or others who guide farmers (NGOs, CSOs) 

    Topic

    A: Participatory communication on adaptation + mitigation to climate change   B: Community-based solutions to climate change

    New Findings

     Identify the NEW finding in your work – in words that anyone could understand. Describe or explain to your audience why this is important new information. Develop one paragraph.Climate change affects individuals in communities so has to be tackled with participatory community activities. A key element here is the use of multi-media approaches by combining mass media, interpersonal channels and new media (especially radio, farmers’ groups and mobiles/SMS messages) as channels for sharing information and learning from good practices of others.

    New Information

    Describe how your intended audience might use that new information – in words they would understand. How would someone “do it”.Develop one paragraph Or whatever is needed to understand how to implement or utilize this new knowledge. Please be as specific as you can be for your audience and still understandable – newspaper level language.Farmers should get better information seeking habits from media like radio and have farmers’ groups that are active and meet regularly to share information on adaptation and mitigation measures in their locality (local solutions) - with District, Sub-county Extension workers or NGOs as facilitators. Can use these groups to get resources like loans to enhance their capacity for adaptation & mitigation.

    Could you make an sms text of the critical info? (That is often a good way to share new information.) If so, please add it . Communities need to join farmers groups to share information and work out joint local solutions to cope with climate change so as to improve their productivity and welfare  

    Link to paper:

     Link to the Original Paper

    Contact Information

    Dr. Nassanga Goretti Linda Associate Professor Journalism & Communication Department 
    Makerere University P.O.Box 7062, Kampala
    Tel:0414-543919 (Office), 0772-503878 (cell), 0701-503878 (cell)
    e-mail: nassanga@chuss.mak.ac.ug, gnassanga@gmail.com
    website: llc.mak.ac.ug

    Audience

    Media practitioners + trainers

    Topic

    A: Media coverage of climate change B: Low access to climate change information on adaptation and mitigation by farmers

    New Findings

     Identify the NEW finding in your work – in words that anyone could understand. Describe or explain to your audience why this is important new information. Develop one paragraph. Although climate change has become a major global concern and much information is available on this, the media in Uganda are not giving adequate coverage to climate change issues to enable farmers get information on mitigation and adaptation measures to improve their productivity and welfare.

    New Information

    Describe how your intended audience might use that new information – in words they would understand. How would someone “do it”.Develop one paragraph Or whatever is needed to understand how to implement or utilize this new knowledge. Please be as specific as you can be for your audience and still understandable – newspaper level language. Journalists need to mainstream environment and climate change in their reports as these two issues greatly influence people’s welfare, given the fact that Uganda is an agro-based economy. Media is the major source of science information and media need to make deliberate efforts to ensure more coverage of climate issues so as to make information on this more readily available especially to rural farmers. This should contribute to increase in production and improved welfare at household levels and ultimately, to national development. Trainers need to ensure that journalists are well equipped to report on climate change.

    Could you make an sms text of the critical info? (That is often a good way to share new information.) If so, please add it . . . Through increased coverage of climate change issues and how these affect sustainable development, media can make climate information more accessible and thus contribute to improved welfare and national development

    Link to paper:

     Link to the Original Paper

    Contact Information

    Dr. Nassanga Goretti Linda Associate Professor Journalism &
    Communication Department Makerere University
    P.O.Box 7062, Kampala
    Tel:0414-543919 (Office), 0772-503878 (cell), 0701-503878 (cell)
    e-mail: nassanga@chuss.mak.ac.ug, gnassanga@gmail.com
    website: llc.mak.ac.ug

    Audience

    Policy makers, planners and NGOs

    Topic

    A:Gender and climate change

    New Findings

     The study noted that women are most vulnerable to various effects of climate change relating to food shortage, water scarcity and shortage of energy or fuel wood due to their limited access to and control of resources, reproductive roles, and unequal power relations in households

    How to use this information

    Through capacity building and training of various stakeholders (policy makers, planners and NGOs) on how to adequately integrate gender into climate change related interventions, there could be encouragement and promotion of equal and mutual household decision-making on resource use and management

    Climate change is not gender specific despite the fact that women are most vulnerable to its effects. So, there is a need to increase awareness among men and women in the various communities about the causes of climate change and relevant mitigation, coping and adaptation strategies to address its impacts

    Link to paper:

     Link to the Original Paper

    Contact Information

    Consolata Kabonesa, PhD
    Makerere University
    College of Humanities & Social Sciences
    School of Women and Gender Studies
    P.O.Box 7062, Kampala
    Tel: +256 041 531 484
    Mobile: +256 752 359 772
    e-mail: consolata.kabonesa@gmail.com

    Audience

    Policy makers

    Topic

    A:Water cycle response to climate change

    New Findings

     Models suggest that even though warmer long term trends in weather will lead to a basin-wide increase in precipitation and subsequent increase in stream flows for the Mpologoma basin, excessive loss of water from land (through plants and directly from soil) might lead to a decline in soil moisture. This may cause serious concerns for food security and water resource maintenance for present and future generation

    How to use this information

    This information is a wakeup call for policy makers to develop adaptation strategies in and around the Mpologoma basin so as to combat issues of water conflicts and food insecurity that may arise

    Climate models assume excessive loss of water from land to the atmosphere (air) over time leading to a decline in soil moisture. So, adaptive strategies to help to avoid water conflicts and food insecurity need to be developed as early as possible

    Link to paper:

     Link to the Original Paper

    Contact Information

    Max Kigobe, PhD
    Makerere University
    College of Engineering, Design, Art and Technology (CEDAT)
    Department of Civil Engineering (http://cedat.mak.ac.ug/)
    Water Resources Engineering/Hydroinformatics/Hydrology
    P.O.Box 7062, Kampala
    Tel: +256 414 532 647
    Mobile: +256 772 588 833
    e-mail: mkigobe@cedat.mak.ac.ug

    Audience

    Researchers, extension workers

    Topic

    A:Participatory farmers’ evaluation of maize varieties

    New Findings

     Farmers’ choice of a given maize variety was mainly influenced by the physical characteristics of the seeds especially if the variety had not been planted before. Large seed grain size was preferred to the small seed grain size. Sometimes farmers are also reluctant to take up some good varieties (for example seeds of high yield potential, early maturity and tolerance to drought, pests and diseases) either due to inadequate knowledge or lack of extension advice

    How to use this information

    Commercial seed producers/researchers should always ensure that new seed varieties released on market are of normal grain size to avoid potentially best performing crop varieties being rejected by farmers because of their physical appearance. Researchers and extension workers should incorporate farmers’ indigenous knowledge and preferences into their scientific knowledge during the selection of maize varieties at every stage of technology development and transfer. This would make farmers more knowledgeable about what to plant and thus increase their likelihood of taking up the new/improved varieties

    Farmers seem to prefer large size seeds for planting and incorporating farmers’ indigenous knowledge and preferences during the breeding process/improvement of the varieties by scientists would greatly increase their likelihood of cooperating with the researchers and extension workers and taking up the new crops

    Link to paper:

     Link to the Original Paper

    Contact Information

    Bernard Obaa, PhD
    Makerere University
    College of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences (CAES)
    Department of Extension and Innovation Studies
    Water Resources Engineering/Hydroinformatics/Hydrology
    P.O.Box 7062, Kampala
    Mobile: +256 772 660 006
    e-mail: obaaben@agric.mak.ac.ug

    Audience

    Policy makers

    Topic

    A:Impacts and Adaptations B: Climate Variability and Change in Inland Riparian and Aquatic Ecosystems and Fisheries

    New Findings

     Climate change increases water temperature, causes unpredictable precipitation and changes other important factors like: how deep light can go in the water, the nutrients that are available, and how much oxygen is available for the fish. These changes affect the numbers of fish available to catch and the livelihoods of the people who depend on fish and other aquatic ecosystem services. When these impacts are felt, fishers adapt to the changes either by intensifying fishing operations or diversifying their livelihoods

    How to use this information

    This information can support efforts to increase awareness of climate impacts on fisheries and support sharing information about how to adapt to impacts of climate change on lakes, rivers, wetlands and livelihoods

    Climate change is real and affecting people’s livelihoods through negatively impacting the normal functioning of aquatic resources. So, action is needed to assist fishers in how to diversify their livelihoods or reduce climate impacts on water bodies

    Link to paper:

     Link to the Original Paper

    Contact Information

    Dr Ogutu-Ohwayo, Richard,
    National Fisheries Resources Research Institute
    College of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences (CAES)
    Department of Extension and Innovation Studies
    Water Resources Engineering/Hydroinformatics/Hydrology
    P. O. Box 343, Jinja, Uganda
    Tel: +256 772 421 094 or +256 752 421 094 Fax: +256 434 129192
    e-mail: ogutuohwayo@yahoo.com; ogutuohwayo@gmail.com

    Audience

    Fishers, Policy makers

    Topic

    A:Equipping small scale fishers & riparian communities with adaptation strategies and innovations to cope with impacts of climate variability and change

    New Findings

     Besides switching to catching the most abundant African catfish and Lungfish, innovative fishers diversified to high value crops such as pineapples, oranges, tomatoes, cabbages plus livestock and poultry farming which increased their income. However, adaptation was sometimes accompanied by unsustainable practices like cultivation at the edge of the lakes, extensive harvesting of papyrus and use of pesticides which could negatively affect the fish habitat and fisheries business

    How to use this information

    With this information, fishers can be advised on better ways of adapting to climate change through promoting environmental practices that will benefit them and the future generation

    Climate change is affecting aquatic resources, so sustainable environmental management is the way to go not only for our own benefit but also for the future generation to enjoy the resources

    Link to paper:

     Link to the Original Paper

    Contact Information

    Dr Ogutu-Ohwayo, Richard,
    National Fisheries Resources Research Institute
    College of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences (CAES)
    Department of Extension and Innovation Studies
    Water Resources Engineering/Hydroinformatics/Hydrology
    P. O. Box 343, Jinja, Uganda
    Tel: +256 772 421 094 or +256 752 421 094 Fax: +256 434 129192
    e-mail: ogutuohwayo@yahoo.com; ogutuohwayo@gmail.com

    Audience

    Academia/educational institutions

    Topic

    A: National climate change learning strategy and approaches

    New Findings

     This document provides support and strategies to broaden climate change education opprotunities

    How to use this information

    This is a national supporting document with a vision and strategy for underpinning efforts to broaden climate change education opportunities to prepare people for green jobs

    Link to paper:

     Link to the Original Paper

    Contact Information

    Prof. John Baptist Kaddu,
    Makerere University Kampala
    College of Natural Sciences
    Department of Zology
    Water Resources Engineering/Hydroinformatics/Hydrology
    P.O. Box 7062, Kampala, Uganda
    Tel: +256 772 453 778 e-mail: johnkaddu2006@yahoo.co.uk

    Audience

    policy makers

    Topic

    A: policy information B: supportive of a specific policy option

    New Findings

     Acknowledgement of ranges from Climate models (computer simulations/ tested mathematical equations) is fundamental to the decision-making process. If climate change projections are based on a single simulation, a wide range of possible outcomes would be ignored. This would provide misleading information to the public and decision makers and may also lead to wrong decisions

    How to use this information

    If policy makers gather all projections that reflect ranges from climate models, hydrological models and other techniques, it would be easier and more accurate for them to forecast nearly every potential change rather than basing/assuming a one-way cause-effect relationship

    The wide range of outcomes from models (computer simulations) should not be underestimated but rather combined with non-climatic factors such as population growth, agricultural water demand so as to plan appropriate adaptation measures

    Link to paper:

     Link to the Original Paper

    Contact Information

    Max Kigobe, PhD
    Makerere University Kampala
    College of Engineering, Design, Art and Technology (CEDAT)
    Department of Civil Engineering (http://cedat.mak.ac.ug/
    Water Resources Engineering/Hydroinformatics/Hydrology
    P.O. Box 7062, Kampala, Uganda
    Tel: +256 414 532 647 Mobile : +256 772 588 833 e-mail: mkigobe@cedat.mak.ac.ug

     

       

         

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        • Makerere University- Uganda. East Africa
        • Phone: +256 414 542 277
        • Email: muccri@caes.mak.ac.ug

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